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Sleeve flat

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447,000
* €/m2
Sleeve Cap Ease
209 m2 | 6 bedrooms | 3 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
set-in sleeves: flat vs. round. There are two ways to set in sleeves, one is easier than the other. I thought I'd show you both for today's sewing. Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. By knitting them flat, the sweater can just lie there politely while I work back and forth across the sleeve. To me, it's a much more pleasant.

She also co-hosts the Love to Sew Podcast! Helen is obsessed with all things sewing and strives to share her passion and knowledge with the sewing community. Thank you for the tip. Should there be a pivot at the underarm or should I be stitching a curve as it goes round? Your email address will not be published. Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email. All new newsletter subscribers get a special gift from us! The Costa Tote showcases the quality design and instruction you can expect from Helen's Closet Patterns. Subscribe now by entering your email address. We promise not to share your details with anyone. Read more about our Privacy Policy. Next, bend the left side down and place a pin on the end. Anchor the notches together with a third pin. Again, anchor the spot where the notches are and fill in the remaining side with pins.

Your pinned sleeve should look something like this: Sew the sleeve in using a small zig-zag stitch. If you like, you can finish the seam with a serger before pressing it toward the sleeve. Do you like sewing in your sleeves using the flat method? Any tips are welcome! Do we need to notch and trim the shoulder seam?

Ease and stay stitching take more time but are totally worth it! I always get fast and nice results from sewing sleeves in flat. Sign up for my email newsletter and receive my ruffled apron pattern totally FREE! We take your privacy seriously. See our privacy policy here. Unsubscribe at any time. Thanks for the visuals.

I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating! I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking. I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves.

You said it! Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses? I would love one. I would totally be interested! Thanks for this. One wash and they were awful. Bless You! Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!!! My name is Kate, a twenty something fashion lover and mother of two.

You can read more about me here. Thank you for visiting! Search this website. If you need to, pull your ease stitching a little to adjust the fit of the sleeve into the sleeve opening. Sew your sleeve into the opening.

192,000
* €/m2
Banksia sewalong: flat sleeve insertion
159 m2 | 1 bedrooms | 2 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
A flat sleeve is sewn in before the side seams are sewn up. The sleeve cap is sewn to the armscye and then seam at the bottom of the sleeve is. Most of the patterns for woven garments have sleeve cap ease. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat (as opposed to sewing. When sewn flat, only shoulder seams are sewn and the sleeve is attached flat. Afterwards, the sleeve and side seam are sewn up. Saltbox gives.

Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier. But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!!

Just reading through comments and thought I would show you a great blog post on this topic.. So yes there is a quality difference, but I think you may not really notice anytime except in tailored garments. Thanks for this tutorial! I used it on a shirt I made today, and it was so much easier and faster! I am wearing my new blouse now, and am extremely pleased with it. I also made a facing for the neck, instead of their little collar thing, lengthened the blouse 5inches and extended and belled out the sleeves.

That is more changing to a pattern than I have ever done, and I am really happy with it. Thanks for helping with your wonderful tutorial! Get access to our library of FREE sewing patterns, exclusive monthly discounts and be the first to hear about new patterns! Enter your email address to receive Design Diary blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox.

All done! Never miss a post! Most reacted comment. Hottest comment thread. Recent comment authors. Notify of. Store Newsletter Get access to our library of FREE sewing patterns, exclusive monthly discounts and be the first to hear about new patterns!

I always get fast and nice results from sewing sleeves in flat. Sign up for my email newsletter and receive my ruffled apron pattern totally FREE! We take your privacy seriously. See our privacy policy here. Unsubscribe at any time. Thanks for the visuals. I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating!

I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking. I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves. You said it! Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses? I would love one. I would totally be interested! Thanks for this. One wash and they were awful. Bless You!

Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!!! My name is Kate, a twenty something fashion lover and mother of two. You can read more about me here.

Thank you for visiting! Search this website. If you need to, pull your ease stitching a little to adjust the fit of the sleeve into the sleeve opening. Sew your sleeve into the opening.

You see why it is called the flat method?

325,000
* €/m2
Reader Interactions
122 m2 | 1 bedrooms | 7 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
When sewn flat, only shoulder seams are sewn and the sleeve is attached flat. Afterwards, the sleeve and side seam are sewn up. Saltbox gives. Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. By knitting them flat, the sweater can just lie there politely while I work back and forth across the sleeve. To me, it's a much more pleasant.

Enter your email address to receive our blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. Your tutorials simplify sewing techniques so succinctly. They are incredibly easy to follow and the photographs illustrate your points perfectly. Thank you, Megan :. Ditto that Nessie! Bloody loving it! And super-keen to try your other patterns after this one. Perfect example of the technique. I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way.

Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier. But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!!

Just reading through comments and thought I would show you a great blog post on this topic.. So yes there is a quality difference, but I think you may not really notice anytime except in tailored garments. Thanks for this tutorial! I used it on a shirt I made today, and it was so much easier and faster! I am wearing my new blouse now, and am extremely pleased with it. I also made a facing for the neck, instead of their little collar thing, lengthened the blouse 5inches and extended and belled out the sleeves.

Turn your garment inside out, but leave your sleeve right side out. Stick it in the sleeve hole and pin in all around. Then sew it up! The press it. Finish your seam however you want. Ease and stay stitching take more time but are totally worth it! I always get fast and nice results from sewing sleeves in flat. Sign up for my email newsletter and receive my ruffled apron pattern totally FREE! We take your privacy seriously.

See our privacy policy here. Unsubscribe at any time. Thanks for the visuals. I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating! I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking.

I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves. You said it! Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses? I would love one. I would totally be interested! Thanks for this. One wash and they were awful. Bless You! Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!!! My name is Kate, a twenty something fashion lover and mother of two.

462,000
* €/m2
Sewing patterns to unleash your creative talent
120 m2 | 3 bedrooms | 5 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
set-in sleeves: flat vs. round. There are two ways to set in sleeves, one is easier than the other. I thought I'd show you both for today's sewing. Pin the side seam and sleeves together all at once. Sew up from the bottom to the end of the sleeve. Sewing a sleeve in flat. That's it! Sewing in a. By knitting them flat, the sweater can just lie there politely while I work back and forth across the sleeve. To me, it's a much more pleasant.

Pin in place, then sew and neaten the edges. Enter your email address to receive our blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. Your tutorials simplify sewing techniques so succinctly.

They are incredibly easy to follow and the photographs illustrate your points perfectly. Thank you, Megan :. Ditto that Nessie! Bloody loving it! And super-keen to try your other patterns after this one. Perfect example of the technique. I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way. Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier.

But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!! Just reading through comments and thought I would show you a great blog post on this topic..

So yes there is a quality difference, but I think you may not really notice anytime except in tailored garments. Thanks for this tutorial! I used it on a shirt I made today, and it was so much easier and faster! I am wearing my new blouse now, and am extremely pleased with it. You can see in the illustration below — the green line on the sleeve, which is the front sleeve cap, should be longer than the green line on the front, which is the front armhole.

There are debates whether this sleeve cap ease is needed, even among the most experienced pattern makers in the industry. Most of the sewing patterns for woven garments you encounter have this ease. The amount of sleeve cap ease is not absolute. Some have more and some have less. It really depends. And if you have loose-fitting dropped shoulder style, there may not be any sleeve cap ease at all. To tell you a secret, if I need a larger sleeve due to a large bicep, I sometimes could up a size on the sleeve while using the armhole of a smaller size.

I usually am able to ease the extra in without any drama. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat as opposed to sewing in the round, a. Setting in sleeve on a knit garment without having to deal with the sleeve cap ease is a good starting point to those who fear set-in sleeves.

If your pattern has such thing going on, be very suspicious, and try to figure out why before you proceed before potentially wasting your time and fabric. In sewing, you should be matching the seam lines anyway no matter which seam you are sewing. For example, if you are sewing a princess seam with pretty acute curves, matching the cut lines, instead of the seam lines, would give you less than ideal result.

You would be essentially shifting the pieces and then wondering why there is extra fabric at the end. This is as important when you are setting in a sleeve. Notice in the illustration above, the purple and green lines are not at the edges? That is not a coincidence. I did that on purpose. To illustrate this point, showing you some actual numbers is the best way. For the front sleeve cap, it is 5. The front armhole above the notch is 4.

You see how matching cut lines will make your sewing life miserable? Let me beat the dead horse and go one step further. Some fabrics are easier to ease than others. You can stretch the fabric ever so slightly and voila, the seam lines are matched effortlessly.

Natural fibers are also easier to ease. Cotton, wool and linen, for example, tend to be submissive when it comes to pucker-free easing, whether in set-in sleeve, or other easing exercises like in princess seams. Fabric with some texture also work well. Or use it and learn the lesson of how to maximize puckers. There are a million and one tutorials out there for set-in sleeves, but perhaps I could add some extra color and cement the process in your head? There are also many different methods; below is the simplest and most common method.

You may see easing using a sleeve head, with just pins or with steam. I also ease just using my finger to stop the feed while sewing the easing stitch. But I am not going to go there this time. First and foremost, mark the notches on the sleeve and on the armhole. You see that I do a little snip. Snipping within the seam allowance never caused any trouble for me, especially when I serge finish the raw edges.

Just mark them however you like and are comfortable with. Before sewing the sleeve seam the long vertical one that makes the sleeve a tube , I sew two lines of easing stitch on the sleeve cap, one is a hairline next to the seam line in the seam allowance, the second one in the seam allowance. They run from the front single notch to the back double notch. I use a 5 mm stitch length. With that done, now I can sew the sleeve into a tube.

Always press before sewing it to an intersecting seam. If you are finishing the raw edges, now is that time to do it. Now I turn sleeve and the bodice to the right side. Put them next to each other and make sure that the sleeve is in the correct position: the single notch is in the front and the double notch is in the back. I think this is a common problem; people sew the sleeve backward.

With that verified, I can put the right sides together. I usually open the bodice and turn it to the wrong side to make its right side against the right side of the sleeve. The spots I pin first are: 1 the top notch of the sleeve to the shoulder seam; 2 the single notch on the sleeve to the single notch on the armhole; 3 the double notch on the sleeve to the double notch on the armhole; and 4 the sleeve seam to the side seam of the bodice.

They have the same length and should match exactly. Yes, I do have a pinning problem, but I have no intention of getting rid of my habit, unless someone can convince me it would produce better result otherwise.

However, the sleeve cap part is what we need to pay attention to. Notice that the sleeve cap is longer then the armhole. Pull and distribute until the length matches the armhole. You do that for both the front and the back. And then pin pin pin pin pin. Now you can take it the sewing machine.

I go straight to the sewing machine. Also let me take a bit of a detour. Some people like to have the armhole side against the feed dog.

147,000
* €/m2
106 m2 | 9 bedrooms | 2 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
By knitting them flat, the sweater can just lie there politely while I work back and forth across the sleeve. To me, it's a much more pleasant. Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. When sewn flat, only shoulder seams are sewn and the sleeve is attached flat. Afterwards, the sleeve and side seam are sewn up. Saltbox gives.

Your tutorials simplify sewing techniques so succinctly. They are incredibly easy to follow and the photographs illustrate your points perfectly. Thank you, Megan :. Ditto that Nessie! Bloody loving it! And super-keen to try your other patterns after this one. Perfect example of the technique. I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way. Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier.

But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!! Just reading through comments and thought I would show you a great blog post on this topic.. Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to!

Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses? I would love one. I would totally be interested! Thanks for this. One wash and they were awful. Bless You! Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!!!

My name is Kate, a twenty something fashion lover and mother of two. You can read more about me here. Thank you for visiting! Search this website. If you need to, pull your ease stitching a little to adjust the fit of the sleeve into the sleeve opening.

Sew your sleeve into the opening. You see why it is called the flat method? No round seams that cause trouble! Sew it up, pivoting where your sleeve starts. Then finish your seam. Cotton, wool and linen, for example, tend to be submissive when it comes to pucker-free easing, whether in set-in sleeve, or other easing exercises like in princess seams.

Fabric with some texture also work well. Or use it and learn the lesson of how to maximize puckers. There are a million and one tutorials out there for set-in sleeves, but perhaps I could add some extra color and cement the process in your head?

There are also many different methods; below is the simplest and most common method. You may see easing using a sleeve head, with just pins or with steam. I also ease just using my finger to stop the feed while sewing the easing stitch. But I am not going to go there this time. First and foremost, mark the notches on the sleeve and on the armhole. You see that I do a little snip. Snipping within the seam allowance never caused any trouble for me, especially when I serge finish the raw edges.

Just mark them however you like and are comfortable with. Before sewing the sleeve seam the long vertical one that makes the sleeve a tube , I sew two lines of easing stitch on the sleeve cap, one is a hairline next to the seam line in the seam allowance, the second one in the seam allowance.

They run from the front single notch to the back double notch. I use a 5 mm stitch length. With that done, now I can sew the sleeve into a tube. Always press before sewing it to an intersecting seam.

If you are finishing the raw edges, now is that time to do it. Now I turn sleeve and the bodice to the right side. Put them next to each other and make sure that the sleeve is in the correct position: the single notch is in the front and the double notch is in the back. I think this is a common problem; people sew the sleeve backward. With that verified, I can put the right sides together. I usually open the bodice and turn it to the wrong side to make its right side against the right side of the sleeve.

The spots I pin first are: 1 the top notch of the sleeve to the shoulder seam; 2 the single notch on the sleeve to the single notch on the armhole; 3 the double notch on the sleeve to the double notch on the armhole; and 4 the sleeve seam to the side seam of the bodice. They have the same length and should match exactly.

Yes, I do have a pinning problem, but I have no intention of getting rid of my habit, unless someone can convince me it would produce better result otherwise.

However, the sleeve cap part is what we need to pay attention to. Notice that the sleeve cap is longer then the armhole. Pull and distribute until the length matches the armhole.

You do that for both the front and the back. And then pin pin pin pin pin. Now you can take it the sewing machine. I go straight to the sewing machine. Also let me take a bit of a detour.

Some people like to have the armhole side against the feed dog. Some like to have the sleeve side against the feed dog. There are arguments for each method, and I think both are legitimate. The later group thinks that when the sleeve side is against the feed dog, the feed dog can help ease the fabric ever so slightly.

I have done both. I found that either way works well for me. I encourage you to try both and see which one you like best.

535,000
* €/m2
109 m2 | 7 bedrooms | 7 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
set-in sleeves: flat vs. round. There are two ways to set in sleeves, one is easier than the other. I thought I'd show you both for today's sewing. A flat sleeve is sewn in before the side seams are sewn up. The sleeve cap is sewn to the armscye and then seam at the bottom of the sleeve is. When sewn flat, only shoulder seams are sewn and the sleeve is attached flat. Afterwards, the sleeve and side seam are sewn up. Saltbox gives.

The process is similar to an owl twisting its head to look around over one shoulder, then back around to look over the other shoulder. You just clarified the problem and solution. Thank you. Elizabeth Zimmerman was a big believer in seams for structure so you are in excellent company. This may have made me a sweater knitter. OK, so one of my big beefs with top down sweaters is that gauge can really change in the round vs. So when I knit a cardigan top-down, the main part is always back and forth with the sleeve in the round.

I just finished a sweater for my daughter like this and I had to redo the sleeves because they were too tight! I totally agree that knitting sleeves on DPNs with the weight of the sweater is really annoying! Seams provide structure. Just as we would turn into shapeless puddles without our skeletons, a sweater with no seams can become a shapeless mass over time if the yarn is lacking in body or elasticity.

So I salute you for pointing this out to your readers and creating a pattern with stabilizing seams. To the seamless whiners, seaming has been a part of knitting for centuries so put on your big kid panties and learn about it. I agree with Susan about the gauge change. I mostly knit cardigans, so the knit in the round sleeves need a bigger needle. I also like to knit both sleeves at the same time so that the shaping is ide tidal.

I lip it a few rounds individually on each sleeve tight corner relief then I put all the stitches on a single needle and make identical sleeve ses at the same time. It makes last-minute fit adjustments so much simpler. Example: when I knit the Modern Gansey for my son, after wet blocking, the sleeves were just a teeny bit too long.

Since there was no seam to undo, the unravelling and re-knitting of the cuff was no problem. Just remember to turn the sleeve back to the underarm for the start of the next round instead of keeping on going around in a circle. No sewing time at the end. Just wet block and wear! Thank you thank you thank you. What a great technique. It solves all the hassles of knitting sleeves in the round — am definitely going to try it.

Great post. Thank you for sharing. I have been thinking about point 2 since I read your post. Here is how I do it. As I knit, the sleeve twists around counterclockwise. After one round, I hold the yarn in the back and turn the working part of the sleeve back around clockwise. Then I knit another round. The sweater stays stationary in my lap. What does anyone think about knitting the body of a top-down sweater in two pieces below the arm holes for the same reason: side seams for better stability?

I am coming into the discussion late so I am not sure if this is still a life threat, but I thought I would try: do you go down a quarter or half needles size to knit the sleeves in the flat instead of the round? I knitted the sweater in the round with a 3. So I am thinking of going down to 3. Any thoughts? If you know your gauge is meaningfully different when knitting flat and in the round, you would want to do whatever to compensate for that.

Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 5: The art of sweater shaping Fringe Association. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Epilogue: The possibilities are endless Fringe Association. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 4: Separating the sleeves and body Fringe Association.

Pingback: Improv: Basic pattern for a top-down seamless sweater Fringe Association. Fringe Association. So happy I saw this! I think seaming would allow a little more flexibility to make slight adjustments. Thanks for sharing!! Pingback: KTFO I always knit the sleeves flat before knitting the body of the sweater. Then there is no constriction. Pingback: Top posts of Fringe Association. Pingback: FO Hi Karen — thanks for this help. My pattern says to decrease the sleeve every 8th round.

When knitting flat, is this decrease done every 8th row or every 16th? I was looking for permission to work the sleeves with a seam instead of in the round and here it is! One other advantage of not working sleeves circular — I like to work my sleeves simultaneously on my long circular back and forth.

That way I know that every decrease or increase is worked on the exact same row and the sleeves will be the same length. So happy I stumbled onto this site!!! The cool thing about doing the sleeve this way, is that you can now sew the sleeve side seam, and shirt side seam all in one go!

Turn the top inside out so that the right sides are facing each other, and line up the side seams. Pin in place, then sew and neaten the edges. Enter your email address to receive our blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. Your tutorials simplify sewing techniques so succinctly. They are incredibly easy to follow and the photographs illustrate your points perfectly.

Thank you, Megan :. Ditto that Nessie! Bloody loving it! And super-keen to try your other patterns after this one. Perfect example of the technique.

I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way. Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier. But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!! Just reading through comments and thought I would show you a great blog post on this topic..

So yes there is a quality difference, but I think you may not really notice anytime except in tailored garments. Thanks for this tutorial!

276,000
* €/m2
259 m2 | 6 bedrooms | 8 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
When sewn flat, only shoulder seams are sewn and the sleeve is attached flat. Afterwards, the sleeve and side seam are sewn up. Saltbox gives. Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. Pin the side seam and sleeves together all at once. Sew up from the bottom to the end of the sleeve. Sewing a sleeve in flat. That's it! Sewing in a.

Thank you. Elizabeth Zimmerman was a big believer in seams for structure so you are in excellent company. This may have made me a sweater knitter. OK, so one of my big beefs with top down sweaters is that gauge can really change in the round vs. So when I knit a cardigan top-down, the main part is always back and forth with the sleeve in the round. I just finished a sweater for my daughter like this and I had to redo the sleeves because they were too tight!

I totally agree that knitting sleeves on DPNs with the weight of the sweater is really annoying! Seams provide structure. Just as we would turn into shapeless puddles without our skeletons, a sweater with no seams can become a shapeless mass over time if the yarn is lacking in body or elasticity. So I salute you for pointing this out to your readers and creating a pattern with stabilizing seams.

To the seamless whiners, seaming has been a part of knitting for centuries so put on your big kid panties and learn about it. I agree with Susan about the gauge change. I mostly knit cardigans, so the knit in the round sleeves need a bigger needle. I also like to knit both sleeves at the same time so that the shaping is ide tidal.

I lip it a few rounds individually on each sleeve tight corner relief then I put all the stitches on a single needle and make identical sleeve ses at the same time. It makes last-minute fit adjustments so much simpler. Example: when I knit the Modern Gansey for my son, after wet blocking, the sleeves were just a teeny bit too long. Since there was no seam to undo, the unravelling and re-knitting of the cuff was no problem.

Just remember to turn the sleeve back to the underarm for the start of the next round instead of keeping on going around in a circle. No sewing time at the end. Just wet block and wear! Thank you thank you thank you. What a great technique. It solves all the hassles of knitting sleeves in the round — am definitely going to try it.

Great post. Thank you for sharing. I have been thinking about point 2 since I read your post. Here is how I do it. As I knit, the sleeve twists around counterclockwise. After one round, I hold the yarn in the back and turn the working part of the sleeve back around clockwise.

Then I knit another round. The sweater stays stationary in my lap. What does anyone think about knitting the body of a top-down sweater in two pieces below the arm holes for the same reason: side seams for better stability? I am coming into the discussion late so I am not sure if this is still a life threat, but I thought I would try: do you go down a quarter or half needles size to knit the sleeves in the flat instead of the round?

I knitted the sweater in the round with a 3. So I am thinking of going down to 3. Any thoughts? If you know your gauge is meaningfully different when knitting flat and in the round, you would want to do whatever to compensate for that. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 5: The art of sweater shaping Fringe Association. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Epilogue: The possibilities are endless Fringe Association. Thank you for the tip.

Should there be a pivot at the underarm or should I be stitching a curve as it goes round? Your email address will not be published. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. All new newsletter subscribers get a special gift from us! The Costa Tote showcases the quality design and instruction you can expect from Helen's Closet Patterns.

Subscribe now by entering your email address. We promise not to share your details with anyone. Read more about our Privacy Policy. Next, bend the left side down and place a pin on the end. Anchor the notches together with a third pin.

Again, anchor the spot where the notches are and fill in the remaining side with pins. I am wearing my new blouse now, and am extremely pleased with it. I also made a facing for the neck, instead of their little collar thing, lengthened the blouse 5inches and extended and belled out the sleeves.

That is more changing to a pattern than I have ever done, and I am really happy with it. Thanks for helping with your wonderful tutorial! Get access to our library of FREE sewing patterns, exclusive monthly discounts and be the first to hear about new patterns! Enter your email address to receive Design Diary blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox.

All done! Never miss a post! Most reacted comment. Hottest comment thread. Recent comment authors. Notify of. Store Newsletter Get access to our library of FREE sewing patterns, exclusive monthly discounts and be the first to hear about new patterns!

101,000
* €/m2
207 m2 | 5 bedrooms | 10 bathrooms | Furnished | Parking place | Swimming-pool | Gardens
Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. Most of the patterns for woven garments have sleeve cap ease. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat (as opposed to sewing. By knitting them flat, the sweater can just lie there politely while I work back and forth across the sleeve. To me, it's a much more pleasant.

I got frustrated with magic loop halfway down a sleeve once, switched to knotting back and forth and the difference in quality and gauge even after blocking was amazing. Thank you! I always knit my sleeves flat.

It just makes a better sleeve, IMO, and it is faster and more pleasant, especially if you are knitting stripes. At the beginning awkward stage, I just use two needles, changing from one to the other until the sleeve flattens out. Also, if you mark your decreases with a running thread on each side, it makes the seaming even more of a breeze. I also knit flat sleeves on sweaters in the round only ever knit one in the round she eve and boy was it a chore.

Karen, I often choose to knit sleeves flat, mostly to avoid switching to dpns. However, if the sleeve is loose-fitting and wide enough, I use a short circular needle. I finish a sleeve in a couple of hours, without spinning the sweater in my lap.

I put the sweater body in my lap, knit around the sleeve as far as possible, until it is twisted against the body. Then I untwist the sleeve and knit the rest of the round. No need to move the sweater. The process is similar to an owl twisting its head to look around over one shoulder, then back around to look over the other shoulder. You just clarified the problem and solution. Thank you. Elizabeth Zimmerman was a big believer in seams for structure so you are in excellent company.

This may have made me a sweater knitter. OK, so one of my big beefs with top down sweaters is that gauge can really change in the round vs. So when I knit a cardigan top-down, the main part is always back and forth with the sleeve in the round.

I just finished a sweater for my daughter like this and I had to redo the sleeves because they were too tight! I totally agree that knitting sleeves on DPNs with the weight of the sweater is really annoying! Seams provide structure. Just as we would turn into shapeless puddles without our skeletons, a sweater with no seams can become a shapeless mass over time if the yarn is lacking in body or elasticity.

So I salute you for pointing this out to your readers and creating a pattern with stabilizing seams. To the seamless whiners, seaming has been a part of knitting for centuries so put on your big kid panties and learn about it. I agree with Susan about the gauge change. I mostly knit cardigans, so the knit in the round sleeves need a bigger needle. I also like to knit both sleeves at the same time so that the shaping is ide tidal.

I lip it a few rounds individually on each sleeve tight corner relief then I put all the stitches on a single needle and make identical sleeve ses at the same time. It makes last-minute fit adjustments so much simpler. Example: when I knit the Modern Gansey for my son, after wet blocking, the sleeves were just a teeny bit too long. Since there was no seam to undo, the unravelling and re-knitting of the cuff was no problem. Just remember to turn the sleeve back to the underarm for the start of the next round instead of keeping on going around in a circle.

No sewing time at the end. Just wet block and wear! Thank you thank you thank you. What a great technique. It solves all the hassles of knitting sleeves in the round — am definitely going to try it. Great post. Thank you for sharing. I have been thinking about point 2 since I read your post. Here is how I do it. As I knit, the sleeve twists around counterclockwise.

After one round, I hold the yarn in the back and turn the working part of the sleeve back around clockwise. Then I knit another round. The sweater stays stationary in my lap. What does anyone think about knitting the body of a top-down sweater in two pieces below the arm holes for the same reason: side seams for better stability? I am coming into the discussion late so I am not sure if this is still a life threat, but I thought I would try: do you go down a quarter or half needles size to knit the sleeves in the flat instead of the round?

I knitted the sweater in the round with a 3. So I am thinking of going down to 3. Any thoughts? If you know your gauge is meaningfully different when knitting flat and in the round, you would want to do whatever to compensate for that.

Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 5: The art of sweater shaping Fringe Association. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Epilogue: The possibilities are endless Fringe Association. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 4: Separating the sleeves and body Fringe Association.

Pingback: Improv: Basic pattern for a top-down seamless sweater Fringe Association. Fringe Association. So happy I saw this! I think seaming would allow a little more flexibility to make slight adjustments. This is a bit awkward and you will need to move project around to make it happen. Pin the side seam and sleeves together all at once. Sew up from the bottom to the end of the sleeve.

Sewing in a sleeve flat is a bit easier, faster, and it works great for knits. For more structured garments like jackets and coats, setting in the sleeve works much better because it gives the armhole a nice, round shape. Helen Wilkinson is the designer and founder of Helen's Closet Patterns. She also co-hosts the Love to Sew Podcast! Helen is obsessed with all things sewing and strives to share her passion and knowledge with the sewing community.

Thank you for the tip. Should there be a pivot at the underarm or should I be stitching a curve as it goes round? Your email address will not be published. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. All new newsletter subscribers get a special gift from us!

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We promise not to share your details with anyone. Read more about our Privacy Policy. Next, bend the left side down and place a pin on the end. Anchor the notches together with a third pin.

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A flat sleeve is sewn in before the side seams are sewn up. The sleeve cap is sewn to the armscye and then seam at the bottom of the sleeve is. Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. set-in sleeves: flat vs. round. There are two ways to set in sleeves, one is easier than the other. I thought I'd show you both for today's sewing.

Pin in place, then sew and neaten the edges. Enter your email address to receive our blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. Your tutorials simplify sewing techniques so succinctly. They are incredibly easy to follow and the photographs illustrate your points perfectly. Thank you, Megan :. Ditto that Nessie! Bloody loving it! And super-keen to try your other patterns after this one. Perfect example of the technique.

I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way. Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. Finish your seam however you want. Ease and stay stitching take more time but are totally worth it!

I always get fast and nice results from sewing sleeves in flat. Sign up for my email newsletter and receive my ruffled apron pattern totally FREE! We take your privacy seriously. See our privacy policy here. Unsubscribe at any time. Thanks for the visuals. I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating! I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking.

I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves. You said it! Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses?

I would love one. Most of the sewing patterns for woven garments you encounter have this ease. The amount of sleeve cap ease is not absolute. Some have more and some have less. It really depends. And if you have loose-fitting dropped shoulder style, there may not be any sleeve cap ease at all. To tell you a secret, if I need a larger sleeve due to a large bicep, I sometimes could up a size on the sleeve while using the armhole of a smaller size.

I usually am able to ease the extra in without any drama. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat as opposed to sewing in the round, a. Setting in sleeve on a knit garment without having to deal with the sleeve cap ease is a good starting point to those who fear set-in sleeves. If your pattern has such thing going on, be very suspicious, and try to figure out why before you proceed before potentially wasting your time and fabric.

In sewing, you should be matching the seam lines anyway no matter which seam you are sewing. For example, if you are sewing a princess seam with pretty acute curves, matching the cut lines, instead of the seam lines, would give you less than ideal result. You would be essentially shifting the pieces and then wondering why there is extra fabric at the end.

This is as important when you are setting in a sleeve. Notice in the illustration above, the purple and green lines are not at the edges? That is not a coincidence. I did that on purpose. To illustrate this point, showing you some actual numbers is the best way. For the front sleeve cap, it is 5.

The front armhole above the notch is 4. You see how matching cut lines will make your sewing life miserable? Let me beat the dead horse and go one step further. Some fabrics are easier to ease than others. You can stretch the fabric ever so slightly and voila, the seam lines are matched effortlessly. Natural fibers are also easier to ease. Cotton, wool and linen, for example, tend to be submissive when it comes to pucker-free easing, whether in set-in sleeve, or other easing exercises like in princess seams.

Fabric with some texture also work well. Or use it and learn the lesson of how to maximize puckers. There are a million and one tutorials out there for set-in sleeves, but perhaps I could add some extra color and cement the process in your head?

There are also many different methods; below is the simplest and most common method. You may see easing using a sleeve head, with just pins or with steam. I also ease just using my finger to stop the feed while sewing the easing stitch. But I am not going to go there this time. First and foremost, mark the notches on the sleeve and on the armhole.

You see that I do a little snip. Snipping within the seam allowance never caused any trouble for me, especially when I serge finish the raw edges. Just mark them however you like and are comfortable with. Before sewing the sleeve seam the long vertical one that makes the sleeve a tube , I sew two lines of easing stitch on the sleeve cap, one is a hairline next to the seam line in the seam allowance, the second one in the seam allowance.

They run from the front single notch to the back double notch. I use a 5 mm stitch length. With that done, now I can sew the sleeve into a tube.

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Most of the patterns for woven garments have sleeve cap ease. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat (as opposed to sewing. Pin the side seam and sleeves together all at once. Sew up from the bottom to the end of the sleeve. Sewing a sleeve in flat. That's it! Sewing in a. set-in sleeves: flat vs. round. There are two ways to set in sleeves, one is easier than the other. I thought I'd show you both for today's sewing.

You can undo that little portion and retry. And for some minuscule pucker, you may be able to steam it out even. I find that they could create some light ruffling shadow underneath the sleeve.

Oh, I press the seam toward the sleeve to support the sleeve cap, but I heard people pressing it open or even toward the bodice. Follow the instructions of your pattern, or experiment. You might like one look better than the other. Looks like my next sleeve will work sew much better.

Just one thing. I think that perhaps the text to the second illustration has the back and front reversed. Thank you.

The set in sleeve is my nemesis. The patterns say to gather between the dots, but on and a cotton woven, there is too much fabric to ease without puckering. I spent the whole afternoon with one sleeve yesterday!

I will unpick the stitching and ease between the notches clips today. I also now have permission to reduce the seam allowance on the sleeve cap if necessary! Wish me luck!

Have a great day! Great post and tutorial! Which would seam to restrict arm movement. For a cotton with minimal stretch approximately how much ease do you leave at the armpit area of bodice.

Thanks Brianna. Wow, wow, wow!!! This really is a brilliant tutorial. Thank you so much for this tutorial. Thank you x.

I appreciate this so much! I am new to garment sewing, and this is by far the best tutorial on sleeves for wovens that I have read and I am reading all I can find. I have an elementary question: why is it better to sew woven shirt sleeves on the round rather than the flat? Hi Lori, nice to hear from you! Knit sleeve head usually does not have extra ease because the knit fabric has stretch and can give you the movement you need.

Hence you can sew it flat. For woven sleeve, extra ease is built in for movement, and you will need to ease the extra in. The 3-D explanation for the ease makes sense. Thank you! This really helped me take the process slower and not mess it up because I was hurrying. Let us bask! Fabulously written and illustrated, thanks for taking the time to do this. The only thing that really helped me on my journey was to abandon pins for basting, because the basting allows so much more control and moves with the fabric.

Pins seemed to work against me in their hard, rigid, no-movement holding together. Thread basting moves with the fabric and makes the sewing at the machine inch by inch, as you noted a non-stressful, even joyful event where the manipulation I do brings such satisfaction. I have always had trouble with set in sleeves, so I followed your instructions to the letter.

See our privacy policy here. Unsubscribe at any time. Thanks for the visuals. I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating! I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking. I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves.

You said it! Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses? I would love one. I would totally be interested! Thanks for this. One wash and they were awful. Bless You! Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!!! No need to move the sweater. The process is similar to an owl twisting its head to look around over one shoulder, then back around to look over the other shoulder. You just clarified the problem and solution.

Thank you. Elizabeth Zimmerman was a big believer in seams for structure so you are in excellent company. This may have made me a sweater knitter. OK, so one of my big beefs with top down sweaters is that gauge can really change in the round vs.

So when I knit a cardigan top-down, the main part is always back and forth with the sleeve in the round. I just finished a sweater for my daughter like this and I had to redo the sleeves because they were too tight! I totally agree that knitting sleeves on DPNs with the weight of the sweater is really annoying! Seams provide structure.

Just as we would turn into shapeless puddles without our skeletons, a sweater with no seams can become a shapeless mass over time if the yarn is lacking in body or elasticity. So I salute you for pointing this out to your readers and creating a pattern with stabilizing seams. To the seamless whiners, seaming has been a part of knitting for centuries so put on your big kid panties and learn about it.

I agree with Susan about the gauge change. I mostly knit cardigans, so the knit in the round sleeves need a bigger needle. I also like to knit both sleeves at the same time so that the shaping is ide tidal. I lip it a few rounds individually on each sleeve tight corner relief then I put all the stitches on a single needle and make identical sleeve ses at the same time.

It makes last-minute fit adjustments so much simpler. Example: when I knit the Modern Gansey for my son, after wet blocking, the sleeves were just a teeny bit too long. Since there was no seam to undo, the unravelling and re-knitting of the cuff was no problem. Just remember to turn the sleeve back to the underarm for the start of the next round instead of keeping on going around in a circle. No sewing time at the end. Just wet block and wear! Thank you thank you thank you.

What a great technique. It solves all the hassles of knitting sleeves in the round — am definitely going to try it. Great post. Thank you for sharing. I have been thinking about point 2 since I read your post. Here is how I do it. As I knit, the sleeve twists around counterclockwise.

After one round, I hold the yarn in the back and turn the working part of the sleeve back around clockwise. Then I knit another round. The sweater stays stationary in my lap. What does anyone think about knitting the body of a top-down sweater in two pieces below the arm holes for the same reason: side seams for better stability? I am coming into the discussion late so I am not sure if this is still a life threat, but I thought I would try: do you go down a quarter or half needles size to knit the sleeves in the flat instead of the round?

I knitted the sweater in the round with a 3. So I am thinking of going down to 3. Any thoughts?

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set-in sleeves: flat vs. round. There are two ways to set in sleeves, one is easier than the other. I thought I'd show you both for today's sewing. Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. Most of the patterns for woven garments have sleeve cap ease. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat (as opposed to sewing.

I mostly knit cardigans, so the knit in the round sleeves need a bigger needle. I also like to knit both sleeves at the same time so that the shaping is ide tidal. I lip it a few rounds individually on each sleeve tight corner relief then I put all the stitches on a single needle and make identical sleeve ses at the same time. It makes last-minute fit adjustments so much simpler. Example: when I knit the Modern Gansey for my son, after wet blocking, the sleeves were just a teeny bit too long.

Since there was no seam to undo, the unravelling and re-knitting of the cuff was no problem. Just remember to turn the sleeve back to the underarm for the start of the next round instead of keeping on going around in a circle. No sewing time at the end.

Just wet block and wear! Thank you thank you thank you. What a great technique. It solves all the hassles of knitting sleeves in the round — am definitely going to try it.

Great post. Thank you for sharing. I have been thinking about point 2 since I read your post. Here is how I do it. As I knit, the sleeve twists around counterclockwise. After one round, I hold the yarn in the back and turn the working part of the sleeve back around clockwise. Then I knit another round. The sweater stays stationary in my lap. What does anyone think about knitting the body of a top-down sweater in two pieces below the arm holes for the same reason: side seams for better stability?

I am coming into the discussion late so I am not sure if this is still a life threat, but I thought I would try: do you go down a quarter or half needles size to knit the sleeves in the flat instead of the round?

I knitted the sweater in the round with a 3. So I am thinking of going down to 3. Any thoughts? If you know your gauge is meaningfully different when knitting flat and in the round, you would want to do whatever to compensate for that. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 5: The art of sweater shaping Fringe Association.

Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Epilogue: The possibilities are endless Fringe Association. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 4: Separating the sleeves and body Fringe Association.

Pingback: Improv: Basic pattern for a top-down seamless sweater Fringe Association. Fringe Association. So happy I saw this! I think seaming would allow a little more flexibility to make slight adjustments. Thanks for sharing!! Pingback: KTFO I always knit the sleeves flat before knitting the body of the sweater. Then there is no constriction. Pingback: Top posts of Fringe Association.

Pingback: FO Hi Karen — thanks for this help. My pattern says to decrease the sleeve every 8th round. When knitting flat, is this decrease done every 8th row or every 16th? I was looking for permission to work the sleeves with a seam instead of in the round and here it is!

One other advantage of not working sleeves circular — I like to work my sleeves simultaneously on my long circular back and forth. That way I know that every decrease or increase is worked on the exact same row and the sleeves will be the same length.

So happy I stumbled onto this site!!! The perfect solution to knitting sleeves in the round is to do them on 2 circular needles. I make socks on 2 circs, small child garments on 2 circs, and so on. When you separate the sleeves and body, find the center stitch on the armhole, and work that stitch in purl all the way down the body and down the sleeves: instant fake seem.

Pingback: Q for You: Would you rather knit the sleeves or the body? Dear Karen, why does no one think to attach cuff up sleeve parts to a top down upper sleeve part? Any suggestion for how to join them?!

Someone who thinks exactly like I do! I hate knitting sleeves in the round, though I usually do it that way. Share this:. Brilliant post, as always! Howver, you lost me with this instruction.

Many thanks for how you help all of us advance our skills. Got it. Yep, exactly. Lay the sleeve right side facing down, and pin from under arm to underarm, shaping the sleeve into the armsyce as you go. Sew the sleeve seam, and then finish the raw edges. Press the sleeve seam towards the sleeve. The cool thing about doing the sleeve this way, is that you can now sew the sleeve side seam, and shirt side seam all in one go!

Turn the top inside out so that the right sides are facing each other, and line up the side seams. Pin in place, then sew and neaten the edges. Enter your email address to receive our blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. Your tutorials simplify sewing techniques so succinctly. They are incredibly easy to follow and the photographs illustrate your points perfectly.

Thank you, Megan :. Ditto that Nessie! Bloody loving it! And super-keen to try your other patterns after this one. Perfect example of the technique. I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way. Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier.

But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!!

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Most of the patterns for woven garments have sleeve cap ease. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat (as opposed to sewing. Actually I'd say I use this most often for knits. Okie dokie, here we go: how to do a flat sleeve insertion on the Banksia Blouse // tutorial on Megan. By knitting them flat, the sweater can just lie there politely while I work back and forth across the sleeve. To me, it's a much more pleasant.

There are also many different methods; below is the simplest and most common method. You may see easing using a sleeve head, with just pins or with steam. I also ease just using my finger to stop the feed while sewing the easing stitch. But I am not going to go there this time.

First and foremost, mark the notches on the sleeve and on the armhole. You see that I do a little snip. Snipping within the seam allowance never caused any trouble for me, especially when I serge finish the raw edges. Just mark them however you like and are comfortable with. Before sewing the sleeve seam the long vertical one that makes the sleeve a tube , I sew two lines of easing stitch on the sleeve cap, one is a hairline next to the seam line in the seam allowance, the second one in the seam allowance.

They run from the front single notch to the back double notch. I use a 5 mm stitch length. With that done, now I can sew the sleeve into a tube. Always press before sewing it to an intersecting seam.

If you are finishing the raw edges, now is that time to do it. Now I turn sleeve and the bodice to the right side. Put them next to each other and make sure that the sleeve is in the correct position: the single notch is in the front and the double notch is in the back.

I think this is a common problem; people sew the sleeve backward. With that verified, I can put the right sides together. I usually open the bodice and turn it to the wrong side to make its right side against the right side of the sleeve.

The spots I pin first are: 1 the top notch of the sleeve to the shoulder seam; 2 the single notch on the sleeve to the single notch on the armhole; 3 the double notch on the sleeve to the double notch on the armhole; and 4 the sleeve seam to the side seam of the bodice.

They have the same length and should match exactly. Yes, I do have a pinning problem, but I have no intention of getting rid of my habit, unless someone can convince me it would produce better result otherwise. However, the sleeve cap part is what we need to pay attention to. Notice that the sleeve cap is longer then the armhole. Pull and distribute until the length matches the armhole.

You do that for both the front and the back. And then pin pin pin pin pin. Now you can take it the sewing machine. I go straight to the sewing machine. Also let me take a bit of a detour. Some people like to have the armhole side against the feed dog. Some like to have the sleeve side against the feed dog. There are arguments for each method, and I think both are legitimate. The later group thinks that when the sleeve side is against the feed dog, the feed dog can help ease the fabric ever so slightly.

I have done both. I found that either way works well for me. I encourage you to try both and see which one you like best. Now I stitch around the armhole. What happens if there is a pucker or two or five? You can undo that little portion and retry. And for some minuscule pucker, you may be able to steam it out even.

Turn your garment inside out, but leave your sleeve right side out. Stick it in the sleeve hole and pin in all around. Then sew it up! The press it. Finish your seam however you want. Ease and stay stitching take more time but are totally worth it! I always get fast and nice results from sewing sleeves in flat.

Sign up for my email newsletter and receive my ruffled apron pattern totally FREE! We take your privacy seriously. See our privacy policy here. Unsubscribe at any time. Thanks for the visuals. I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating! I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking. I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves.

You said it! Hat Needle? Tight bend in the rows? Does that help? How do I pick up and knit stitches at the beginning AND end of the live sleeve stitches? I can do the ones to the left of the under arm as you look at the RS — the first 4-plus-1 but at the end?

What with? You pick up and knit underarm stitches starting in the middle of the underarm. Then end with picking up and knitting the other half of underarm stitches. I hope this helps! I was finding using a magic loop when knitting in cotton I live in a warm climate and a 10ply wool sweater is not going to get worn was not giving a neat and even stitch result. In other BT patterns, the selvedges are garter or twisted garter stitch. I got frustrated with magic loop halfway down a sleeve once, switched to knotting back and forth and the difference in quality and gauge even after blocking was amazing.

Thank you! I always knit my sleeves flat. It just makes a better sleeve, IMO, and it is faster and more pleasant, especially if you are knitting stripes.

At the beginning awkward stage, I just use two needles, changing from one to the other until the sleeve flattens out. Also, if you mark your decreases with a running thread on each side, it makes the seaming even more of a breeze. I also knit flat sleeves on sweaters in the round only ever knit one in the round she eve and boy was it a chore. Karen, I often choose to knit sleeves flat, mostly to avoid switching to dpns.

However, if the sleeve is loose-fitting and wide enough, I use a short circular needle. I finish a sleeve in a couple of hours, without spinning the sweater in my lap. I put the sweater body in my lap, knit around the sleeve as far as possible, until it is twisted against the body. Then I untwist the sleeve and knit the rest of the round. No need to move the sweater.

The process is similar to an owl twisting its head to look around over one shoulder, then back around to look over the other shoulder. You just clarified the problem and solution. Thank you. Elizabeth Zimmerman was a big believer in seams for structure so you are in excellent company. This may have made me a sweater knitter. OK, so one of my big beefs with top down sweaters is that gauge can really change in the round vs. So when I knit a cardigan top-down, the main part is always back and forth with the sleeve in the round.

I just finished a sweater for my daughter like this and I had to redo the sleeves because they were too tight! I totally agree that knitting sleeves on DPNs with the weight of the sweater is really annoying!

Seams provide structure. Just as we would turn into shapeless puddles without our skeletons, a sweater with no seams can become a shapeless mass over time if the yarn is lacking in body or elasticity. So I salute you for pointing this out to your readers and creating a pattern with stabilizing seams. To the seamless whiners, seaming has been a part of knitting for centuries so put on your big kid panties and learn about it.

I agree with Susan about the gauge change. I mostly knit cardigans, so the knit in the round sleeves need a bigger needle. I also like to knit both sleeves at the same time so that the shaping is ide tidal.

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A flat sleeve is sewn in before the side seams are sewn up. The sleeve cap is sewn to the armscye and then seam at the bottom of the sleeve is. Free Fashion Flat Templates + Trim Pack - Courses & Free Tutorials on Adobe Illustrator, Tech Packs & Freelancing for Fashion Designers. Free templates. By knitting them flat, the sweater can just lie there politely while I work back and forth across the sleeve. To me, it's a much more pleasant.

I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way. Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier.

But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!! Just reading through comments and thought I would show you a great blog post on this topic..

So yes there is a quality difference, but I think you may not really notice anytime except in tailored garments. Thanks for this tutorial! I used it on a shirt I made today, and it was so much easier and faster! I am wearing my new blouse now, and am extremely pleased with it. I also made a facing for the neck, instead of their little collar thing, lengthened the blouse 5inches and extended and belled out the sleeves.

That is more changing to a pattern than I have ever done, and I am really happy with it. Thanks for helping with your wonderful tutorial! Thanks for the visuals. I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating! I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking. I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves.

You said it! Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses? I would love one. I would totally be interested! Thanks for this. One wash and they were awful. Bless You! Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!!! My name is Kate, a twenty something fashion lover and mother of two.

You can read more about me here. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Epilogue: The possibilities are endless Fringe Association. Pingback: How to improvise a top-down sweater, Part 4: Separating the sleeves and body Fringe Association.

Pingback: Improv: Basic pattern for a top-down seamless sweater Fringe Association. Fringe Association. So happy I saw this! I think seaming would allow a little more flexibility to make slight adjustments. Thanks for sharing!! Pingback: KTFO I always knit the sleeves flat before knitting the body of the sweater.

Then there is no constriction. Pingback: Top posts of Fringe Association. Pingback: FO Hi Karen — thanks for this help. My pattern says to decrease the sleeve every 8th round. When knitting flat, is this decrease done every 8th row or every 16th?

I was looking for permission to work the sleeves with a seam instead of in the round and here it is! One other advantage of not working sleeves circular — I like to work my sleeves simultaneously on my long circular back and forth. That way I know that every decrease or increase is worked on the exact same row and the sleeves will be the same length.

So happy I stumbled onto this site!!! The perfect solution to knitting sleeves in the round is to do them on 2 circular needles. I make socks on 2 circs, small child garments on 2 circs, and so on. When you separate the sleeves and body, find the center stitch on the armhole, and work that stitch in purl all the way down the body and down the sleeves: instant fake seem.

Pingback: Q for You: Would you rather knit the sleeves or the body? Dear Karen, why does no one think to attach cuff up sleeve parts to a top down upper sleeve part? Any suggestion for how to join them?! Someone who thinks exactly like I do! I hate knitting sleeves in the round, though I usually do it that way. Share this:. Brilliant post, as always! Howver, you lost me with this instruction. Many thanks for how you help all of us advance our skills.

Got it. Yep, exactly. Thank you very much for the information. Very helpful!! This may have made me a sweater knitter Loading Thank you thank you thank you Loading Channel is actually written for in-the-round sleeves … Loading Thank you x Loading Graftng with kitchener stitch seems like the right answer?

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A flat sleeve is sewn in before the side seams are sewn up. The sleeve cap is sewn to the armscye and then seam at the bottom of the sleeve is. Actually I'd say I use this most often for knits. Okie dokie, here we go: how to do a flat sleeve insertion on the Banksia Blouse // tutorial on Megan. Most of the patterns for woven garments have sleeve cap ease. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat (as opposed to sewing.

Example: when I knit the Modern Gansey for my son, after wet blocking, the sleeves were just a teeny bit too long. Since there was no seam to undo, the unravelling and re-knitting of the cuff was no problem. Just remember to turn the sleeve back to the underarm for the start of the next round instead of keeping on going around in a circle. No sewing time at the end. Just wet block and wear! Thank you thank you thank you. What a great technique.

It solves all the hassles of knitting sleeves in the round — am definitely going to try it. Great post. Thank you for sharing. I have been thinking about point 2 since I read your post. Here is how I do it.

As I knit, the sleeve twists around counterclockwise. After one round, I hold the yarn in the back and turn the working part of the sleeve back around clockwise. Then I knit another round. The sweater stays stationary in my lap. What does anyone think about knitting the body of a top-down sweater in two pieces below the arm holes for the same reason: side seams for better stability?

I am coming into the discussion late so I am not sure if this is still a life threat, but I thought I would try: do you go down a quarter or half needles size to knit the sleeves in the flat instead of the round? I knitted the sweater in the round with a 3. So I am thinking of going down to 3. Any thoughts? If you know your gauge is meaningfully different when knitting flat and in the round, you would want to do whatever to compensate for that.

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Fringe Association. So happy I saw this! I think seaming would allow a little more flexibility to make slight adjustments. Thanks for sharing!! Pingback: KTFO I always knit the sleeves flat before knitting the body of the sweater. Then there is no constriction. Pingback: Top posts of Fringe Association. Pingback: FO Hi Karen — thanks for this help. My pattern says to decrease the sleeve every 8th round. When knitting flat, is this decrease done every 8th row or every 16th?

I was looking for permission to work the sleeves with a seam instead of in the round and here it is! One other advantage of not working sleeves circular — I like to work my sleeves simultaneously on my long circular back and forth. I have done both. I found that either way works well for me. I encourage you to try both and see which one you like best.

Now I stitch around the armhole. What happens if there is a pucker or two or five? You can undo that little portion and retry. And for some minuscule pucker, you may be able to steam it out even.

I find that they could create some light ruffling shadow underneath the sleeve. Oh, I press the seam toward the sleeve to support the sleeve cap, but I heard people pressing it open or even toward the bodice. Follow the instructions of your pattern, or experiment. You might like one look better than the other.

Looks like my next sleeve will work sew much better. Just one thing. I think that perhaps the text to the second illustration has the back and front reversed. Thank you. The set in sleeve is my nemesis. The patterns say to gather between the dots, but on and a cotton woven, there is too much fabric to ease without puckering. I spent the whole afternoon with one sleeve yesterday! I will unpick the stitching and ease between the notches clips today. I also now have permission to reduce the seam allowance on the sleeve cap if necessary!

Wish me luck! Have a great day! Great post and tutorial! Which would seam to restrict arm movement. For a cotton with minimal stretch approximately how much ease do you leave at the armpit area of bodice. Thanks Brianna. Wow, wow, wow!!! This really is a brilliant tutorial. Thank you so much for this tutorial. Thank you x. I appreciate this so much! I am new to garment sewing, and this is by far the best tutorial on sleeves for wovens that I have read and I am reading all I can find.

I have an elementary question: why is it better to sew woven shirt sleeves on the round rather than the flat? Hi Lori, nice to hear from you! Knit sleeve head usually does not have extra ease because the knit fabric has stretch and can give you the movement you need.

Hence you can sew it flat. For woven sleeve, extra ease is built in for movement, and you will need to ease the extra in. The 3-D explanation for the ease makes sense. Thank you! This really helped me take the process slower and not mess it up because I was hurrying.

Let us bask! The press it. Finish your seam however you want. Ease and stay stitching take more time but are totally worth it! I always get fast and nice results from sewing sleeves in flat. Sign up for my email newsletter and receive my ruffled apron pattern totally FREE! We take your privacy seriously.

See our privacy policy here. Unsubscribe at any time. Thanks for the visuals. I will have to try the flat method next time. It seems like it would be less frustrating! I prefer sewing sleeves flat too. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking.

I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves. You said it! Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses?

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set-in sleeves: flat vs. round. There are two ways to set in sleeves, one is easier than the other. I thought I'd show you both for today's sewing. Pin the side seam and sleeves together all at once. Sew up from the bottom to the end of the sleeve. Sewing a sleeve in flat. That's it! Sewing in a. Most of the patterns for woven garments have sleeve cap ease. Typically in knit garments, the sleeves are sewn in flat (as opposed to sewing.

Sew the sleeve seam, and then finish the raw edges. Press the sleeve seam towards the sleeve. The cool thing about doing the sleeve this way, is that you can now sew the sleeve side seam, and shirt side seam all in one go! Turn the top inside out so that the right sides are facing each other, and line up the side seams. Pin in place, then sew and neaten the edges.

Enter your email address to receive our blog posts and updates from our store right to your inbox. Read our Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions. Your tutorials simplify sewing techniques so succinctly. They are incredibly easy to follow and the photographs illustrate your points perfectly. Thank you, Megan :. Ditto that Nessie! Bloody loving it! And super-keen to try your other patterns after this one.

Perfect example of the technique. I learned how to put sleeves in the old fashioned way. Now I use it for almost everything. Thanks for sharing. I always find it difficult matching up the side seams and the sleeve seams,and this one looks so much easier.

But yeah, i totally agree — this one for sure feels easier!! Just reading through comments and thought I would show you a great blog post on this topic.. It takes a lot of pain out of setting in the sleeves and I believe makes the garment more professional looking.

I like your tutorial. I think it is encouraging for the new sewer who may avoid projects with sleeves. You said it!

Thanks for sharing. Thanks for the great how to! Do you have a pattern for those cute dresses? I would love one. I would totally be interested! Thanks for this. One wash and they were awful. Bless You! Thankyou thankyou thankyou!!!!! My name is Kate, a twenty something fashion lover and mother of two.

You can read more about me here. Thank you for visiting! Search this website. If you need to, pull your ease stitching a little to adjust the fit of the sleeve into the sleeve opening.

Sew your sleeve into the opening. You see why it is called the flat method? No round seams that cause trouble! Sew it up, pivoting where your sleeve starts. Then finish your seam. So, if you want to save yourself some stress, setting your sleeve in flat is a super easy way to make everything fit.

When all is said and done, they look exactly the same. You may also like these posts Baby Lock Melody Sewing Machine Review sewing opening up a buttonhole sewing deconstructed zipper teeth seam tutorial 25 must-have sewing books.

Flat sewer here :blush: I can sew them in the round but it really is a pita ;-. I always try and sew my sleeves flat.

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